The Lady
Let me know what you think lannymedlin@msn.com

Carol always wanted to see the Statue of Liberty. She affectionately called the statue “the Lady” and always personified her references as to “her” not it. Carol’s connection with “the Lady” was personal and deeply important to her. Every year when planning our vacations she would slyly slip in brochures to New York City.

With the personally tragic news and events of 1998 - 2000, it became a top priority of mine to get Carol to see the Lady. In 2001 I made reservations and booked a flight to New York City in September. Yes, September 2001, 9/11. Carol and I discussed whether we should go, stay, or postpone the trip, but there was never really any doubt, we were going. So, on September 28th, we flew to New Haven, Connecticut and took the train into the city.

Getting to see the Lady was in doubt. Liberty Island was closed after the events of 9/11, but foot traffic was opened to lower Manhattan on September 17th by Mayor Giuliani. I figured we could walk to Battery Park and see the Lady across the bay. The day was overcast and there was a drizzling rain as we made our way past the smoldering heap of the former World Trade Center. The air was filled with the acrid smell of smoke and wet ashes and the empty streets were hauntingly quite. As we approached Battery Park my heart sank, it was surrounded by a 12 foot chain-link fence and off limits to the public. I had to find a way for Carol to see the Lady. We walked along the perimeter towards the east, and I spotted the Lady through a small opening, where a restaurant stood. We moved in as close as possible and over a stack of bar stools Carol finally got to see the Lady.

Liberty Island was finally reopened to the public. In June of 2003, Carol and I took our last trip together. Finally Carol was able to visit with the Lady. Carol’s face was peacefully serene, my heart was happy as we stood at the feet of the symbol of freedom.
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Carol's hints.


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Close as we could get.September 28, 2001


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Castle Clinton in Battery Park where you catch the boat out to Liberty Island.


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The statue watches over boats of New York Harbor.


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The copper-clad state, dedicated on October 28, 1886, commemorates the centennial of the signing of the Declaration of Independence.


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The Statue was given to the United States from France to represent the friendship established during the American Revolution.


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The copper oxidized into a beautiful green.


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The French called the statue "Liberty Enlightening the World" her right arm is raised holding a flame to light the way to freedom.


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Cradled in her left arm is a tablet inscribed with the date July 4 1776.


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Frederic Auguste Bartholdi sculpted the statue and Maurice Koechlin designer of the Eiffel Tower engineered the internal structure.


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The pedestal sits atop an existing 19th century star-shaped fortification named Fort Wood.


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Financing for the pedestal was completed on August 11, 1885 and construction was finished on April 22, 1886.


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On her head is a diadem, a radiant crown.


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The exterior is clothed in sheets of copper.


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The right arm and torch was exhibited at the Centennial Exposition in Philaddelphis in 1876 and then at Madison Square Park until the commencement of construction in 1886.


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In 1916 the original torch was cut up and glass inlayed with interior illumination. Water seeped around the strips causing extensive corrosion.


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In 1986 the original torch was deemed beyond repair and replaced back to the type of the original but was gold plated and illuminated by exterior lights.


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The original torch is on display in the monuments lobby. Since 9/11 the statue and pedestal are closed. The torch was moved outside for viewing of the public.


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The Statue of Liberty stands on Liberty Island in New York Harbor, it welcomes visitors, immigrants, and returning americans traveling by ship.


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The Lady and "The Lady."


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On Liberty Island at last.


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Carol passed away two months later, August 25, 2003. Goodbye to the Lady


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